Facts/Info

Facts

All about San Pedro

San Pedro: Sacred Plant-Medicine

The San Pedro cactus is native to the Andes Mountains and has a long history, more than 3000 years, in Andean traditional medicine. Containing the psychoactive substance mescaline, it is regarded as a healing plant and a profoundly transformative and visionary plant-medicine. Its medicinal use continues into contemporary times here in Peru, where such traditional use is both respected and legal.

San Pedro (Huachuma in Quechua, the native language of the Andean people) is used in traditional healing to address issues of emotional and energetic disturbance, renown for it’s anti-anxiety and anti-depressive qualities, and addressing imbalance between the head and heart spaces.

Anecdotal evidence supports that it has contributed significantly to a wide range of health issues.

From a shamanic perspective San Pedro is regarded as a powerful transformative tool. To drink the medicine is like having a mirror held directly in front of one’s face, and to see reflected therein the energetic status of one’s Self in the minutest detail, like an unraveling of one’s cultural programming. It is regarded as ‘heart-medicine’ and one is encouraged not to spend too much time in the realm of the mind and intellect, trying to figure it out, but rather to ‘feel’ into the experience; to let-go of those points of tension in the body, perhaps remnants of past emotional traumas, and redundant modes of thinking and behaviour – to release the old non-supportive aspects and make space for a new, enlivened and more meaningful relationship; with one’s Self, the persons around us, and indeed with the sentience of the very planet that supports us. Muchas Gracias Pachamama.

As a sacred plant-medicine, San Pedro is said to dissolve the personal ego and to connect one with one’s Self or the Divine Spirit; and as a visionary plant-medicine, to impart information, not so much through the agency of the mind and intellect, but through enhancing the intuitive capacity – and thus heard in the stillness and yet paradoxical dynamism of the silence of one’s heart-space, one’s own inner seat of the consciousness.

It is said that Ayahuasca shows you your place in the cosmos, and that Huachuma shows you your place in the world. Suzanne and I are committed to providing a safe and respectful space for the use of this medicine, and place emphasis on achieving the practical day-to-day benefits that this medicine potentially offers; to heal, transform, and expand our consciousness, to support our personal growth and better enable us to lead our lives in a more meaningful manner and fulfilling lifestyle.

Machu Picchu and the Sacred Valley

The Sacred Valley starts about 30 Km from Cusco, and runs between Pisaq and Ollantaytambo. It is the rich cultural gateway to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Machu Picchu. The Sacred Valley of the Incas follows the Urubamba River and embraces the spiritual heartland of the Inca empire. Known as the Wilkamayu River in Quechua, it was regarded as the terrestrial reflection of the Milky Way in the indigenous cosmological vision.

The Sacred Valley was the personal holding of the Inca nobility and, was not assigned to any of the four provinces of the Inca Empire of Tawantinsuyo. Today it is one of the most important maize producing areas in the region.

Cusco (3400m) was the capital of the Inca Empire, it is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and as the Historical Capital in the Peruvian Constitution. The chronicler Polo called Cusco ‘the house and dwelling place of the gods, where there was no spring, nor step, nor wall that was not possessed of mystery’.

One may spend a pleasant day wandering the network of streets and alleys in the downtown area, marvelling at the sophisticated Inca stonework; visit some of the many museums, or the Qoricancha – the Inca Temple of the Sun. Shop for unique Andean alpaca textiles in five-star boutiques, or haggle in the handicraft markets, sample traditional street-food or indulge in world-renown Peruvian cuisine. With the presence of the airport, rail links to Machu Picchu and Puno, and national bus service terminal, Cusco is the main transport hub for the area.

Pisaq (2970m) 32 Km from Cusco, is where the Sacred Valley begins. The pueblo of Pisaq is a colonial era town renown for it’s colourful handicrafts market, friendly hostels and cafes, and tranquil Andean atmosphere.

Towering above the town site is the buttress of Apu Intihuatana; the terraces and topography of the mountain forming the shape of a condor – the ‘messenger of the sun’ in the Andean cosmological vision, ‘guardian of the dead’, and responsible for carrying the spirits of the ancestors to the realm beyond – it is the location of the largest Inca burial-ground in the historical empire.

The archeological site is a couple of hours hike above the town (or a short taxi ride); perched on the saddle of this knife-ridged mountain with spectacular views of the surrounding valleys and mountain-landscape. The quality of the stonework here is said to equal that of the far more extensive Machu Picchu. It is estimated that the terracing around Pisaq occupies 65 hectares. The Inca of the day would distribute small packages of seeds from Pisaq as highly-esteemed gifts to his chieftains around the empire.

Heading west out of Pisaq, and down The Sacred Valley towards Machu Picchu, the vista unfolds through a series of traditional Andean towns, with smaller villages perched on the slopes of the surrounding mountainsides. A beautiful mosaic of colourful soils and agricultural fields, revered snow-capped peaks towering in the background.

After Q’oya is Lamay from where a steep zig-zag trail ascends the mountain and weaves through the precipitous cliffs to the infrequently visited, ruins of Huchuy Q’osqo.  Calca is nestled beneath the twin snow-capped peaks of Pitusiray and Sahuasiray – the presiding mountain-deities, or Apu’s, of this section of the valley. From Calca a side-road leads over the mountain to the hot springs at Lares (130 Km from Cusco). Continuing along the Sacred Valley one passes the ruins of Urcos, and the sleepy villages of Harin, Huaran and Huayocari, to Yucay – site of an Inca palace – before arriving at the largest settlement in the valley, Urubamba.

Urubamba is a good base from which to explore the surrounding sites of Moray and Maras.  At Moray the Inca terraced natural circular depressions in the landscape to create an important agricultural-research complex.  At Maras the Salinas, a natural saline-spring is channeled into hundreds of terraced evaporative pools, this is where the internationally renown ‘pink salt’ is produced and continues to be managed by the hereditary families of the area.

From Urubamba we continue down the valley past Yanahuara to Ollantaytambo (2850m) 77 Kmfrom Cusco, which marks the end of the Sacred Valley readily accessible by paved road. A fascinating town of Pre-Colombian architectural style and layout. It was an important military, religious, administrative and agricultural centre, and one of the finest archeological centres in Peru.

Ollantaytambo is also the gateway to the Machu Picchu Sanctuary; either via the train  – a particularly beautiful train ride takes one down the steep climatic-gradient of the valley, descending from high Andean pastureland into the upper margin of the Amazonian Rainforest; or one can drive over the mountain to Santa Maria and Santa Teresa, experience the beautiful hot springs, and enter Machu Picchu via the ‘backdoor’ route.

Machu Picchu (2430m)112 Km from Cusco; a three-hour train ride from Cusco, or an hour-and-a-half if boarding at Ollantaytambo.

Machu Picchu is referred to as the fabled ‘crystal city’ – the bedrock being comprised of about 70% quartz. A thousand meters lower in elevation than Cusco, in the ‘eyebrow of the jungle’ Machu Picchu occupies a stunning location atop a mountain plateau, virtually surrounded by an Omega-shaped curve in the sacred Wilkamayu River. The finest architectural expression of Inca art and their cosmological vision in Peru; different sectors of the complex represent a puma, and a lizard, which when viewed together represent the shape of a condor – a most mysterious and exquisite jig-saw puzzle. In Quechua, Machu Picchu means old mountain or ‘old bird’ – the divine guardian spirit of peace amongst men

Food at Hummingbird Retreat

vegie harvest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At Hummingbird Retreat, healthy, wholesome, fresh and organic produce are an integral part of our philosophy and it will set your experience with us apart from any other retreat in the Valley.

In-depth personal work has potential to have varying effects on participants’ eating habits, therefore this system provides the most flexibility to suit your needs.

A large variety of fresh produce and other food ingredients are provided for your convenience. Your accommodation has its own kitchen allowing you to prepare and consume food at your leisure.  You can choose the food that feeds your body, nurtures your soul and enlivens your spirit.

The property itself has an extensive organic garden that frequently flourishes with a variety of seasonal vegetables, fruits and herbs, ensuring there is always something ready to be harvested.  Our fresh and dried herbal teas, jams and pickles are also on hand.

If you have ever delighted in eating beautiful fresh organic eggs from a local farmers market, you will be equally delighted with our home laid eggs. Our chickens are a part of the family, each with a name and unique personality. The chooks have free range of the garden, they are organically fed and very happy; as a result they provide a daily supply of fantastic eggs for a variety of cooking options, amongst our most popular and locally famous include our homemade ice cream and quiches.

Our friendly neighbours supply fresh milk, honey and cream, making our homemade treats amongst the most desirable in the local area. Local and well-tendered cows and bees contribute to the wholesomeness of these ingredients.

We also provide an assortment of fresh fruit from the amazon jungle. Produce from the jungle is transported without cold storage and ready for consumption within just a few days from picking. Amongst the variety of jungle fruits include an array of mangos, pineapples, cherimoya, papaya, fresh ginger, turmeric and more exotic jungle foods. These vibrant ingredients make wonderful smoothies combined with super foods of the Andes and the jungle.

We cater to a range of dietary options including meat-eaters, vegetarians, vegans and gluten free.

For any other dietary requirements please contact us.

Machu Picchu & the Sacred Valley

The Sacred Valley starts about 30 Km from Cusco, and runs between Pisaq and Ollantaytambo. It is the rich cultural gateway to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Machu Picchu. The Sacred Valley of the Incas follows the Urubamba River and embraces the spiritual heartland of the Inca empire. Known as the Wilkamayu River in Quechua, it was regarded as the terrestrial reflection of the Milky Way in the indigenous cosmological vision.

The Sacred Valley was the personal holding of the Inca nobility and, was not assigned to any of the four provinces of the Inca Empire of Tawantinsuyo. Today it is one of the most important maize producing areas in the region.

Cusco (3400m) was the capital of the Inca Empire, it is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and as the Historical Capital in the Peruvian Constitution. The chronicler Polo called Cusco ‘the house and dwelling place of the gods, where there was no spring, nor step, nor wall that was not possessed of mystery’.

One may spend a pleasant day wandering the network of streets and alleys in the downtown area, marvelling at the sophisticated Inca stonework; visit some of the many museums, or the Qoricancha – the Inca Temple of the Sun. Shop for unique Andean alpaca textiles in five-star boutiques, or haggle in the handicraft markets, sample traditional street-food or indulge in world-renown Peruvian cuisine. With the presence of the airport, rail links to Machu Picchu and Puno, and national bus service terminal, Cusco is the main transport hub for the area.

Pisaq (2970m) 32 Km from Cusco, is where the Sacred Valley begins. The pueblo of Pisaq is a colonial era town renown for it’s colourful handicrafts market, friendly hostels and cafes, and tranquil Andean atmosphere.

Towering above the town site is the buttress of Apu Intihuatana; the terraces and topography of the mountain forming the shape of a condor – the ‘messenger of the sun’ in the Andean cosmological vision, ‘guardian of the dead’, and responsible for carrying the spirits of the ancestors to the realm beyond – it is the location of the largest Inca burial-ground in the historical empire.

The archeological site is a couple of hours hike above the town (or a short taxi ride); perched on the saddle of this knife-ridged mountain with spectacular views of the surrounding valleys and mountain-landscape. The quality of the stonework here is said to equal that of the far more extensive Machu Picchu. It is estimated that the terracing around Pisaq occupies 65 hectares. The Inca of the day would distribute small packages of seeds from Pisaq as highly-esteemed gifts to his chieftains around the empire.

Heading west out of Pisaq, and down The Sacred Valley towards Machu Picchu, the vista unfolds through a series of traditional Andean towns, with smaller villages perched on the slopes of the surrounding mountainsides. A beautiful mosaic of colourful soils and agricultural fields, revered snow-capped peaks towering in the background.

After Q’oya is Lamay from where a steep zig-zag trail ascends the mountain and weaves through the precipitous cliffs to the infrequently visited, ruins of Huchuy Q’osqo.  Calca is nestled beneath the twin snow-capped peaks of Pitusiray and Sahuasiray – the presiding mountain-deities, or Apu’s, of this section of the valley. From Calca a side-road leads over the mountain to the hot springs at Lares (130 Km from Cusco). Continuing along the Sacred Valley one passes the ruins of Urcos, and the sleepy villages of Harin, Huaran and Huayocari, to Yucay – site of an Inca palace – before arriving at the largest settlement in the valley, Urubamba.

Urubamba is a good base from which to explore the surrounding sites of Moray and Maras.  At Moray the Inca terraced natural circular depressions in the landscape to create an important agricultural-research complex.  At Maras the Salinas, a natural saline-spring is channeled into hundreds of terraced evaporative pools, this is where the internationally renown ‘pink salt’ is produced and continues to be managed by the hereditary families of the area.

From Urubamba we continue down the valley past Yanahuara to Ollantaytambo (2850m) 77 Kmfrom Cusco, which marks the end of the Sacred Valley readily accessible by paved road. A fascinating town of Pre-Colombian architectural style and layout. It was an important military, religious, administrative and agricultural centre, and one of the finest archeological centres in Peru.

Ollantaytambo is also the gateway to the Machu Picchu Sanctuary; either via the train  – a particularly beautiful train ride takes one down the steep climatic-gradient of the valley, descending from high Andean pastureland into the upper margin of the Amazonian Rainforest; or one can drive over the mountain to Santa Maria and Santa Teresa, experience the beautiful hot springs, and enter Machu Picchu via the ‘backdoor’ route.

Machu Picchu (2430m)112 Km from Cusco; a three-hour train ride from Cusco, or an hour-and-a-half if boarding at Ollantaytambo.

Machu Picchu is referred to as the fabled ‘crystal city’ – the bedrock being comprised of about 70% quartz. A thousand meters lower in elevation than Cusco, in the ‘eyebrow of the jungle’ Machu Picchu occupies a stunning location atop a mountain plateau, virtually surrounded by an Omega-shaped curve in the sacred Wilkamayu River. The finest architectural expression of Inca art and their cosmological vision in Peru; different sectors of the complex represent a puma, and a lizard, which when viewed together represent the shape of a condor – a most mysterious and exquisite jig-saw puzzle. In Quechua, Machu Picchu means old mountain or ‘old bird’ – the divine guardian spirit of peace amongst men

Sustainability

Hummingbird Retreat operates with a strong sustainability ethos in all areas from water to food and building materials to recycling.

The Retreat buildings and facilities have been built utilising locally sourced sustainable materials including adobe (mud bricks), stone and timber. The retreat has been designed to sit in harmony with the natural environment.  The surrounding gardens are all organically grown and maintained, with the chickens being an integral part of the garden.

Hummingbird Retreat takes various measures to minimise our impact upon the natural environment as well as caring for and respecting local culture and community.

We expect all visitors to help us conserve this precious location.

 

Our Sustainability Highlights:

People:            Respect and understanding of the local culture, people and heritage is paramount to all our operations. Hummingbird Retreat Peru provides support to local communities in a variety of ways, click here for more information.

Water:              During the dry season we are challenged with regular water shortages and we kindly request guests minimise their water consumption where possible. We have installed some water tanks and are in the process of installing a rainwater tank system.

To reduce the use of water and protect the soil all garden beds are extensively mulched.

Only human waste goes in the toilet system. Toilet paper and sanitary napkins are put in the bin. Natural soaps are used.

Energy:            Lighting is kept to a minimum and garden lighting is all solar powered. We have future plans for installing as many energy-saving initiatives as possible, including solar, LED lighting, making use of candles and minimizing use of any electrical equipment.

Waste:             Fresh produce and purchasing habits minimize the amount of waste we have on the property. We take our own bags to the market, refillable containers to collect honey and milk. Other measures we take to keep waste to a minimum include:

Compost:         Each cabin has a compost bucket.  All green waste from the property is composted on site to revitalise our gardens.

Re-cycling:       Plastics are recycled in the local village of Pisaq, however we request visitors try avoid these in the first place.

We give all (unavoidable) plastic bags to our local fruit lady who reuses them in the market.

Soap:               Natural home made soaps are made on the property with no packaging and provided for your enjoyment. These are free of any chemical nasties.

Food:               All food home grown is organic other food is locally sourced.

Our Community

One of the things that make where we live and work so special are the people who live here.  We would like to introduce you to some of the wonderful people who make up our local community.

Karen who is from the Mochica culture and her husband Louise from Ica have two unique shops  Mochica in Pisaq. One is close to the plaza offering handicrafts, crystals and silver jewellery and other mystical products.   The other sells organic food, cosmetics, Peruvian super foods and herbal remedies.

Karen & Luis

Karen who is from the Mochica culture and her husband Louise from Ica have two unique shops Mochica in Pisaq. One is close to the plaza offering handicrafts, crystals and silver jewellery and other mystical products. The other sells organic food, cosmetics, Peruvian super foods and herbal remedies.
Jorge is the Manager of the picturesque Casa del Conde, our local B & B.  They have 4 bungalows all with private bathroom and serve a great breakfast. www.cuzcovalle.com

Jorge

Jorge is the Manager of the picturesque Casa del Conde, our local B & B. They have 4 bungalows all with private bathroom and serve a great breakfast. www.cuzcovalle.com
Comes from the Yana Tile Valley and has been selling fruit in Pisaq for 20 years.  She sells colourful and exotic fruit from the jungle, Andean Valleys and the coast.  Her non cold storage fruit is available in Pisaq and all year.

Alejandra

Comes from the Yana Tile Valley and has been selling fruit in Pisaq for 20 years. She sells colourful and exotic fruit from the jungle, Andean Valleys and the coast. Her non cold storage fruit is available in Pisaq and all year.
Liza Marie & Bernhard both come from South Africa and run the retreat space Ubuntu Ayni in Huaran.  They conduct regular San Pedro ceremonies
	www.ubuntuayni.com

Lisa Marie & Bernard

Liza Marie & Bernhard both come from South Africa and run the retreat space Ubuntu Ayni in Huaran. They conduct regular San Pedro ceremonies www.ubuntuayni.com
Fresh milk is such a luxury and we feel blessed to
Have Sophia and Bernardino delivering fresh milk from their healthy, happy cows to our door.

Sophia

Fresh milk is such a luxury and we feel blessed to Have Sophia and Bernardino delivering fresh milk from their healthy, happy cows to our door.
From Cajamarca in the north of Peru is the administrator at Ulrike’s café.  He is also the creator of Mystical Adventures Peru, where he takes small groups to the North to discover the unspoilt delights there.

Percy

From Cajamarca in the north of Peru is the administrator at Ulrike’s café. He is also the creator of Mystical Adventures Peru, where he takes small groups to the North to discover the unspoilt delights there.
Miguel has a passion for trekking in the Andes, visiting archaeological sites and natural power-places. He is the owner of ‘Allpamama Journeys’ which specialises in personally-tailored tours for individuals and small-groups, with emphasis on exploring the rich cultural heritage of the region.
	http://alfredoiturriagasj.wix.com/allpamamajourneys

Miguel

Miguel has a passion for trekking in the Andes, visiting archaeological sites and natural power-places. He is the owner of ‘Allpamama Journeys’ which specialises in personally-tailored tours for individuals and small-groups, with emphasis on exploring the rich cultural heritage of the region. http://alfredoiturriagasj.wix.com/allpamamajourneys
Ninety-one year old Don Paulino and his seventy year old wife Doña Nasariya are our neighbours. They actively farm the adjacent property with a fruit orchard and a rotation of maize and quinoa, potatoes onions and alfalfa. They are regularly working in their fields at first light. They work until dusk during the busy seasons; the twice-annual ploughing of their fields by bullock-teams, the sowing, planting, and harvest times.

Pauliño & Nasariya

Ninety-one year old Don Paulino and his seventy year old wife Doña Nasariya are our neighbours. They actively farm the adjacent property with a fruit orchard and a rotation of maize and quinoa, potatoes onions and alfalfa. They are regularly working in their fields at first light. They work until dusk during the busy seasons; the twice-annual ploughing of their fields by bullock-teams, the sowing, planting, and harvest times.
Alejo, originally from Quiabamba on the fringes of the jungle, now lives in a small mountain village above Pisaq.  He is the helpful man who works on the property and keeps the place running smoothly.

Alejo

Alejo, originally from Quiabamba on the fringes of the jungle, now lives in a small mountain village above Pisaq. He is the helpful man who works on the property and keeps the place running smoothly.
Ulrike is the creator of Ulrike’s Café; the prime travellers meeting place in Pisaq.  They have great food; post receiving service, book exchange and notice board of current events.  All this and the best coffee in town.

Ulrike

Ulrike is the creator of Ulrike’s Café; the prime travellers meeting place in Pisaq. They have great food; post receiving service, book exchange and notice board of current events. All this and the best coffee in town.

Our Legacy

Peru is a wonderful country to explore as a visitor. Over the past 30 years it has changed greatly and life for many of the poorer members of society has improved, there are still many possibilities to help. When we held the Spiritual Journeys we collected donations of clothing, toys, school supplies among other items to give away. We still collect these types of items to give away.

We have now started to support female school students with their tuition fees to continue their higher education. This is a project that will leave a lasting impression on their lives and the lives of their families.

Community Service: The Q’enko and Ccaccacollo Relief Effort

2010 saw torrential rains wrecking havoc in Pisaq and the Sacred Valley region of Peru. Several lives were lost, there was widespread damage to family housing and local infrastructure, and the Pisaq bridge collapsed, resulting in the closure of the renown market and tourist business in the community.

Amongst the areas particularly severely affected were the communities lying along the water-course from the overflowing lake of Qoricocha, above the high-elevation pueblo of Q’enko; down through the villages of Ccaccacollo and Taray, before the deluge entered into the Rio Vilcanota.

In the higher villages the people are dependant upon animal grazing, and the potato crop – which suffered disasterously under such wet conditions. The people are poor and ill-equipped to deal with the disasterous consequences of the flooding, and Paul got involved in helping to organize and fund a relief effort for the lesser-known communities of Q’enko and Ccaccacollo, which being off the main tourist route, were likely to receive little, if any, government assistance.

Over the next several months, supported by donations from friends, he organized the regular shipment of essential food supplies, and distribution of winter-clothing to the families most severely affected by the tragedy. This was later augmented by the replacement of building-tools lost in the floods, school materials, some must-purchase building supplies (roofing-material, water-pipe), re-stocking the village trout-hatchery, and assistance with building a medical post.

“The teachings from India equipped me well for looking after myself. Peru is giving me teachings on caring for others” (from the blog posting ‘Return to Ccaccacollo’ 16 March 2010).

Sustainability

Hummingbird Retreat operates with a strong sustainability ethos in all areas from water to food and building materials to recycling.

The Retreat buildings and facilities have been built utilising locally sourced sustainable materials including adobe (mud bricks), stone and timber. The retreat has been designed to sit in harmony with the natural environment.  The surrounding gardens are all organically grown and maintained, with the chickens being an integral part of the garden.

Hummingbird Retreat takes various measures to minimise our impact upon the natural environment as well as caring for and respecting local culture and community.

We expect all visitors to help us conserve this precious location.

 

Our Sustainability Highlights:

People:            Respect and understanding of the local culture, people and heritage is paramount to all our operations. Hummingbird Retreat Peru provides support to local communities in a variety of ways, click here for more information.

Water:              During the dry season we are challenged with regular water shortages and we kindly request guests minimise their water consumption where possible. We have installed some water tanks and have future plans to install more as well as large rainwater tanks.

To reduce the use of water and protect the soil all garden beds are extensively mulched.

Only human waste goes in the toilet system. Toilet paper and sanitary napkins are put in the bin. Natural soaps are used.

Energy:            Lighting is kept to a minimum and garden lighting is all solar powered. We have future plans for installing as many energy-saving initiatives as possible, including solar, LED lighting, making use of candles and minimizing use of any electrical equipment.

Waste:             Fresh produce and purchasing habits minimize the amount of waste we have on the property. We take our own bags to the market, refillable containers to collect honey and milk. Other measures we take to keep waste to a minimum include:

Compost:         Each cabin has a compost bucket.  All green waste from the property is composted on site to revitalise our gardens.

Re-cycling:       Plastics are recycled in the local village of Pisaq, however we request visitors try avoid these in the first place.

We give all (unavoidable) plastic bags to our local fruit lady who reuses them in the market.

Soap:               Natural home made soaps are made on the property with no packaging and provided for your enjoyment. These are free of any chemical nasties.

Food:               All food home grown is organic other food is locally sourced.

Our Community

One of the things that make where we live and work so special are the people who live here.  We would like to introduce you to some of the wonderful people who make up our local community.

Karen who is from the Mochica culture and her husband Louise from Ica have two unique shops  Mochica in Pisaq. One is close to the plaza offering handicrafts, crystals and silver jewellery and other mystical products.   The other sells organic food, cosmetics, Peruvian super foods and herbal remedies.

Karen & Luis

Karen who is from the Mochica culture and her husband Louise from Ica have two unique shops Mochica in Pisaq. One is close to the plaza offering handicrafts, crystals and silver jewellery and other mystical products. The other sells organic food, cosmetics, Peruvian super foods and herbal remedies.
Jorge is the Manager of the picturesque Casa del Conde, our local B & B.  They have 4 bungalows all with private bathroom and serve a great breakfast. www.cuzcovalle.com

Jorge

Jorge is the Manager of the picturesque Casa del Conde, our local B & B. They have 4 bungalows all with private bathroom and serve a great breakfast. www.cuzcovalle.com
Comes from the Yana Tile Valley and has been selling fruit in Pisaq for 20 years.  She sells colourful and exotic fruit from the jungle, Andean Valleys and the coast.  Her non cold storage fruit is available in Pisaq and all year.

Alejandra

Comes from the Yana Tile Valley and has been selling fruit in Pisaq for 20 years. She sells colourful and exotic fruit from the jungle, Andean Valleys and the coast. Her non cold storage fruit is available in Pisaq and all year.
Liza Marie & Bernhard both come from South Africa and run the retreat space Ubuntu Ayni in Huaran.  They conduct regular San Pedro ceremonies
	www.ubuntuayni.com

Lisa Marie & Bernard

Liza Marie & Bernhard both come from South Africa and run the retreat space Ubuntu Ayni in Huaran. They conduct regular San Pedro ceremonies www.ubuntuayni.com
Fresh milk is such a luxury and we feel blessed to
Have Sophia and Bernardino delivering fresh milk from their healthy, happy cows to our door.

Sophia

Fresh milk is such a luxury and we feel blessed to Have Sophia and Bernardino delivering fresh milk from their healthy, happy cows to our door.
From Cajamarca in the north of Peru is the administrator at Ulrike’s café.  He is also the creator of Mystical Adventures Peru, where he takes small groups to the North to discover the unspoilt delights there.

Percy

From Cajamarca in the north of Peru is the administrator at Ulrike’s café. He is also the creator of Mystical Adventures Peru, where he takes small groups to the North to discover the unspoilt delights there.
Miguel has a passion for trekking in the Andes, visiting archaeological sites and natural power-places. He is the owner of ‘Allpamama Journeys’ which specialises in personally-tailored tours for individuals and small-groups, with emphasis on exploring the rich cultural heritage of the region.
	http://alfredoiturriagasj.wix.com/allpamamajourneys

Miguel

Miguel has a passion for trekking in the Andes, visiting archaeological sites and natural power-places. He is the owner of ‘Allpamama Journeys’ which specialises in personally-tailored tours for individuals and small-groups, with emphasis on exploring the rich cultural heritage of the region. http://alfredoiturriagasj.wix.com/allpamamajourneys
Ninety-one year old Don Paulino and his seventy year old wife Doña Nasariya are our neighbours. They actively farm the adjacent property with a fruit orchard and a rotation of maize and quinoa, potatoes onions and alfalfa. They are regularly working in their fields at first light. They work until dusk during the busy seasons; the twice-annual ploughing of their fields by bullock-teams, the sowing, planting, and harvest times.

Pauliño & Nasariya

Ninety-one year old Don Paulino and his seventy year old wife Doña Nasariya are our neighbours. They actively farm the adjacent property with a fruit orchard and a rotation of maize and quinoa, potatoes onions and alfalfa. They are regularly working in their fields at first light. They work until dusk during the busy seasons; the twice-annual ploughing of their fields by bullock-teams, the sowing, planting, and harvest times.
Alejo, originally from Quiabamba on the fringes of the jungle, now lives in a small mountain village above Pisaq.  He is the helpful man who works on the property and keeps the place running smoothly.

Alejo

Alejo, originally from Quiabamba on the fringes of the jungle, now lives in a small mountain village above Pisaq. He is the helpful man who works on the property and keeps the place running smoothly.
Ulrike is the creator of Ulrike’s Café; the prime travellers meeting place in Pisaq.  They have great food; post receiving service, book exchange and notice board of current events.  All this and the best coffee in town.

Ulrike

Ulrike is the creator of Ulrike’s Café; the prime travellers meeting place in Pisaq. They have great food; post receiving service, book exchange and notice board of current events. All this and the best coffee in town.

Our Legacy

Peru is a wonderful country to explore as a visitor. Over the past 30 years it has changed greatly and life for many of the poorer members of society has improved, there are still many possibilities to help. When we held the Spiritual Journeys we collected donations of clothing, toys, school supplies among other items to give away. We still collect these types of items to give away.

We have now started to support female school students with their tuition fees to continue their higher education. This is a project that will leave a lasting impression on their lives and the lives of their families.

Community Service: The Q’enko and Ccaccacollo Relief Effort

2010 saw torrential rains wrecking havoc in Pisaq and the Sacred Valley region of Peru. Several lives were lost, there was widespread damage to family housing and local infrastructure, and the Pisaq bridge collapsed, resulting in the closure of the renown market and tourist business in the community.

Amongst the areas particularly severely affected were the communities lying along the water-course from the overflowing lake of Qoricocha, above the high-elevation pueblo of Q’enko; down through the villages of Ccaccacollo and Taray, before the deluge entered into the Rio Vilcanota.

In the higher villages the people are dependant upon animal grazing, and the potato crop – which suffered disasterously under such wet conditions. The people are poor and ill-equipped to deal with the disasterous consequences of the flooding, and Paul got involved in helping to organize and fund a relief effort for the lesser-known communities of Q’enko and Ccaccacollo, which being off the main tourist route, were likely to receive little, if any, government assistance.

Over the next several months, supported by donations from friends, he organized the regular shipment of essential food supplies, and distribution of winter-clothing to the families most severely affected by the tragedy. This was later augmented by the replacement of building-tools lost in the floods, school materials, some must-purchase building supplies (roofing-material, water-pipe), re-stocking the village trout-hatchery, and assistance with building a medical post.

“The teachings from India equipped me well for looking after myself. Peru is giving me teachings on caring for others” (from the blog posting ‘Return to Ccaccacollo’ 16 March 2010).

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